Sinister (Scott Derrickson, 2012)


Sinister is a horror about a true-crime writer, who moves with his family (wife and 2 children) to a house in a small town, where a whole family was hanged and one little girl vanished without a trace. As soon as they move in, he finds a box with old films: on one of them the said hanging is recorded, others contain other, equally brutal, murders that happened before in various parts of the US over a span of nearly 60 years. He quickly realizes that the killings are connected somehow.

Technical implementation of this movie is very good: all the visual effects, the sounds, the music, the makeup, – these aspects are just great, nothing to complain about at all. Same goes to the acting – every critical figure in the story is depicted with relevance and accuracy.

But the story is kind of stupid. It is designed with no other purpose besides scaring the audience, hence all the dead children, the ancient deity, and so on; the problem here is the lack of relatability. The idea is so far-fetched, hardly anybody could believe in its feasibility and, correspondingly, don it on oneself. And bugaboos for the sake of fear are not that hard to figure out and dismiss as a result. Also, the story is completely predictable: I knew what the ending would be the second that business with repeating addresses faced the surface, which was pretty early. Finally, the unnecessary conditionalities irritated quite a bit: for one thing, why would anybody, after hearing some noise in the middle of the night, walk around without switching lights on in every freaking room along the way? Not to mention incomprehensible decision of not addressing the police about the films – not in the beginning, not even later.

At the same time, I appreciate the fact, that the mythology of this film is not based on christian concepts; but it doesn’t really defeats the aforementioned defects. All in all, the film’s not that scary, and it’s mostly thanks to them.


Time: 01:50:12
Released in: 2012
Directed by: Scott Derrickson
Written by: Scott Derrickson, C. Robert Cargill
Performed by: Ethan Hawke, Juliet Rylance, James Ransone, Fred Dalton Thompson, Michael Hall D’Addario, Clare Foley, Rob Riley, Tavis Smiley, Janet Zappala, Victoria Leigh, Cameron Ocasio, Ethan Haberfield, Danielle Kotch, Blake Mizrahi, Nicholas King
Entertaining quality4- out of 5
Art quality:  4- out of 5

IMDB page: link

(v. 4.8)
®shoomow, 2017
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: